“People come to us and say, ‘We’ve got this problem,’ and we’re immediately assuming that they’re asking us to come up with a solution. Whereas, the right answer is to say, ‘That’s an amazing problem. I don’t know the answer. Let’s figure that out together. Let’s work on that together. Let’s figure out what the best solution might be.”

“We just don’t have the confidence to do that, because we were told right from the get go when we start school, that there’s only one answer for something. You get given a math test, and the math test says there’s a right answer and a wrong answer. You get given an English test and there’s a right answer and a wrong answer.”

“We grow up with this belief that there are only answers. Instead of saying, ‘I don’t know, but here’s something else that we could consider.’ Or, ‘Let’s talk about that and come up with the best answer.’ We’re predisposed to think that for every problem out there, there has to be an answer and we’re supposed to carry that in our back pocket.”

“Whereas in truth, we don’t know what the answers are, especially in this ambiguous future. How could I have possibly known that there were going to be this many devices available in 2016? How was I supposed to know that entire industries’ markets were going to be disrupted by simple ideas?”